•   100 Jericho Quadrangle, Suite 300, Jericho, New York 11753
  •  516-479-6300

SA Connect – Cinco de Mayo Event ..

SA Connect events are the best fun you can have while networking and learning something new.  This month our event coincided with Cinco de Mayo and so we focused on 5 problems facing businesses today.

The room was filled with positive energy and the discussion was spirited and on point.  A good time was had by all.


30 under 30! A celebration of the young talent on Long Island

It was a treat to be part of the Huntington Chamber of Commerce event on May 3rd, at the Woodbury Country Club.   Honorees from very diverse business and non-profit environments highlighted the depth of talent right here on Long Island.  It was a fun event, with some 250 people in attendance.  Our Partners Robert Ansell and Keith Frank joined new associate Adam Sosnik to help support the Huntington Chamber and all of the honorees.


Be Brief! Robert Ansell to lecture at the Long Island Writers Association

Getting the word out … or cut down to size.  Robert Ansell will be presenting at the Long Island Writers Association on May 9th, 2016 on the subject of how brevity can add power to your writing.

 

When Monday, May 9, 2016 at 7:00 PM  Add to Calendar Where Long Island Writers House – 46 Green St, Huntington, NY 11743

The lecture as billed …

‘Do you need to create a bio, synopsis or author platform? Are you counting words for your poem or children’s book? Attorney Robert J. Ansell is trained to maximize the power of minimum words. Come in with too many words and go home with just enough.’

In addition to his professional focus on business and commercial litigation, Robert lectures for nationally recognized Continuing Legal Education programs on corporate and business law.  Additionally, Robert makes frequent appearances at Long Island high schools to judge moot court competitions, and to lecture to business law students.  Robert has written dozens of appellate briefs, and has argued appeals in both state and federal courts.

Robert lives in East Northport with his wife and two children.


Safe Harbor 2.0? The rise and fall of data transfer between the US and European Community.

In an article co-authored by our own James Black and recently published in the European Law Journal, the subject of the demise of the long established – and much bemoaned – US and EU Safe Harbor Agreement (which provided a framework for the transfer of personal data between the US and EU) was discussed.

In an article co-authored by our own James Black and recently published in the European Law Journal, the subject of the demise of the long established – and much bemoaned – US and EU Safe Harbor Agreement (which provided a framework for the transfer of personal data between the US and EU) was discussed.

For almost 15 years the US and EU have had an agreement in place that permitted the exchange of personal information of employees and customers between the EU (which has broad and protective privacy protections) and the US (which does not). The arrangement, called Safe Harbor, was a self-certifying program with little government oversight. In other words, a company could certify that it was in compliance with the Safe Harbor principles, i.e. generally in compliance with European privacy laws. Unless there was a specific complaint made, no one ever checked these companies’ compliance. About 4000 US companies participated in Safe Harbor. In October, 2015, in a case brought by a Belgian citizen who claimed that Facebook was not properly protecting his personal data, the European Court of Justice threw out the Safe Harbor agreement, stating it was void, as it failed to adequately protect the personal information of EU citizens.

The EU and US scrambled to replace Safe Harbor, so that data could flow between the US and EU. In late February, they announced the Privacy Shield Agreement. This agreement has already been heavily criticized as Safe Harbor 2.0. It is still primarily a self-certification program, although the US Department of Commerce has promised to take a more active enforcement role. Each EU member country’s Data Protection Authority (DPA) must agree to the new program. A DPA review has begun but, based on the public statements already made, the EU Commission and US Department of Commerce may find themselves back at the drawing board. Download the full article here.

Whether your firm is one of the nation’s largest defense contractors or new start-up pitching for its first government contract, our team is ready to help. With diverse experience in a wide range of fields and industry sectors, the Government Contracts and Compliance Group deftly navigates this unique intersection of law, business, and government, and to provide our clients with creative, flexible, and effective business strategies.

For more information, contact
James Black at
JBlack@silvermanacampora.com
or call (516) 479-6387